Posts Tagged ‘spade question’

Spade Question #3: What’s Missing In Fashion?

01/04/2011
  • Last Week’s Brainstorm: No more prisons.
  • This week’s brainstorm: What’s missing in fashion?

Each week (on Monday) we feature our weekly brainstorm. This week we focus on the fashion industry at large.

What’s missing in the fashion industry that caters to the ever growing need for design differentiation, customization and consumer preference?

About The Fashion Industry

Ask any fashionista and they’ll tell you that fashion definitely ain’t what it used to be. Here’s why:

We got some insights from an article entitled “What’s Wrong With Fashion?” from fashion blogger Tricia Royal.

The economy: If you’ve been following the news over the past few months you’ll know that its no longer the roaring 90s and the American consumer (read: world consumer) is just about tapped out. As credit lines get tightened and families start to cut-back their budgets to within their means, people will be less willing to shell out their dollars each fashion season. This may begin a phase of second-hand shopping for bargain wear.

Not to mention the exorbant prices now demanded for high-end designer wear. Conversely, this may actually help to differentiate the Saks Fifth Avenues from the Stein Marts.

What is interesting is that some people would still rather spend good money of the latest gadgets (think: iPhone) something that ensures long-lasting, practical use, than buy lots of (inevitably) trendy, disposable clothes. It’s not just that the American consumer is tapped out, but that there’s nothing to tap them back in.

Lack of color: Many critics are beside themselves with regard to the schemes and design palates in recent lines. Black seems to be dominant. “People want and connect with color, but designers aren’t offering it” says Royal. “These dark colors for clothing seem almost funereal, and are, interestingly enough, an apt metaphor for the malaise and fear in the air culturally, politically and economically”.

The overhyped fashion industry machine: “Stuff is churned out so fast and slammed into our face so much – via magazines, blogs, websites and the like – we lose sense of what season we’re in and what’s really significant at any given moment stylistically”. Fashion seems to have sped up to the speed of churning out bulk runs of an identical item. As retailers push new, relevant designs out to their floors constantly, pleasing the customer, big designers have a hard time keeping up.

To make up for this glut, the industry “off-kilter delivery cycle puts clothing on the racks and shelves of stores months before a season actually starts. But people want to wear what they buy RIGHT NOW. Why stash it away for later?? Think putting out spring threads in the dead of winter, fall clothes in the heat of summer.”

In the fashion industry people like to see new and upcoming designs or design a selection of their own. What’s missing from the sales-end is the hit-single, the “must-have” item in the market.

So what’s the consumers biggest complaint and what can we expect in the future?

“Clothes are just blah in terms of style (non-comittal, non-novel, bland details). They are made cheaply of cheap materials. People want to feel their buying an item of value” Tricia tells us.

People want to look good and they want to look different and special. The one-model-fits-all-then-outsource-to-China model concept isn’t working anymore. People want diversity, options and fuction. Gucci and Donna Karen are so last century.

In an age where globalization and niche markets are all the rage, a one-off beats the fashion line any day of the month. The problem is that this model requires intense focus on the niche, and dedication to their marketing “NEADS“, as well as the funding necessary to attend to those neads.

In century 21 the consumer rocks, not the fashion artist. Today, you can create an entire line and be celebrated for one unique feature. Once upon a time an item was just an item – all flash, no fire. Today comfort matters (check these out!). Today affordability matters. Today function (durable, wrinkle-free, machine-washable) takes precedence over form. One could add a pocket here, or a flower there but when you put out a line for athletes that absorbs moisture better, or jeans for teenagers who like a tighter fit (if you have Facebook) – that’s a killer!

It seems that people want to design their own clothes more and more. And those who don’t at least want someone who “gets” them. The fashion market – like the music industry and the publishing industry – is customizing, moving gradually away from the industrialized model, and into the new-age phenomenon of long tails.

Today, thanks to the internet, niches can find niches, and anyone can become their local version of Vercace or Aramani. When this happens, while its true that the power-laws still stand strong (yes, Armani will still outsell most generic brands), small time designers (yourself included) may find their niche.

Lastly, the recent phenomenon of earth-friendly greener ways of living will make a deep impact on fashion (see fact #10). In the same vein, the need to express ourselves will have to go in a very different direction than simply believing that “less is more”. Our ethical and moral standard have been shot to hell, along with what the fashion industry has stood for up until the late of last century.

In the near future the attentive designer will outperform the insensitive ones. Everything will be custom to YOU. Glasses that suit YOU. Suits that fit YOU. Fit and preference that matches YOU. Styles and patterns that cater to your personality. Wear that compliments not compromises your convictions.

“What would YOU like to say” will become an industry-wide trademark.

So today our spade question (is it still?) takes on a different nature. Instead of focusing on a specific problem we are brainstorming ideas for future ideas. The question opens the floor to an array of new ideas and we want to hear them!

What’s missing in the fashion industry that caters to the ever growing need for design differentiation, customization and consumer preference?

We want your ideas! And after that, send the link to some friends. Let’s hear what they have to say!

Advertisements

Brainstorm #2 – No More Prisons

12/29/2010
  • Last Week’s Brainstorm – Being More Productive
  • Interesting Fact – Prisons Today.
  • This week’s brainstorm – No More Prisons Tomorrow.

Just in case you missed it, we featured our first weekly brainstorm on our Facebook Page last week. Our Spade Question was:

What can I do to get more important work done in less time and with less effort?

Here are some of the answers we came up with. (Note how the general ideas begin radical and are then tempered to produce practical, reasonable solutions).

  1. Get excited! Make work something to look forward to. Make it fun and reward yourself.
  2. Slow down time! Get the pre-liminary stuff done during off-hours, then execute powerfully in your most energetic time slots.
  3. Beat bureaucracy! Get people to respond quickly to rapidly developing projects (phone and meetings, over text and email.
  4. Let the work do itself! Make repetitive tasks turn-key by using frameworks and templates. Delegate what you can.
  5. Batch! Pool similar tasks with each other and execute in 50 minute spurts of complete focus and attention.

Prison

This week we based our Spade Question on an interesting fact I came across this week:

The United States puts 0.7 % of its population in Prison – a vastly higher percentage than any other nation. This means that at any given moment there are over 2 million people incarcerated. One can imagine that this does very little to fix an ever growing problem. Is the United States truly safer than ANY other country? Is there no better way to spend the $22,000 – the cost, per inmate, per year?


Think about this one: An individual sentenced to five years for a $300 theft costs the public more than $100,000. Only in America.

Most prisoners come from disadvantaged backgrounds. Most have not completed high school. Many can barely read. Roughly one-third were been unemployed before imprisonment. Another third had annual incomes of less than $5,000. How can months or even years in prison correct this?

It’s no wonder that 52% – half – of prisoners who are released from prison are convicted and sent back within 3 years.

This all begs to question: Are all these “correctional facilities” really correctional?

How can we eliminate Prisons and Incarceration within 10 years?

Here are some ideas we came up with:

  1. Death Penalty! How could we use the death penalty for petty crimes while still being civil? We can fine them “to death” by charging exorbitant fees for crimes – just like we now do for speeding. Everyone hates tickets, why? Because they work!
  2. Tell on them! What if we told everyone who they know what they’ve done. We know that embarrassment isoften the greatest restructuring of a con. A great change occurs when unsympathetic arrestees gain a deeper understanding as to the effects of their crime. This requires education, not imprisonment.
  3. Nuke the lower class. What if we “nuked” the lower class with education that helped them understand the severity of their crimes or that explained how their talents could be put to better, less risky, more profitable use. What if we explained in simple English (or any other language) that selling TV’s can make more money than stealing them (and then selling them).
  4. “ConStraints”. A new device that would act as an “ankle weight” with properties that a) alert law enforcement of the constant whereabouts and up-to-date information on the “prisoner” b) is able to shock the con (similar to taser) – in the event they compromise the safety of their environment. Different features could be added for various levels of the crime committed.

A case for lesser stringency for second convictions: State prisoners with the highest re-arrest rates were those jailed for stealing cars (70%), possessing stolen property (77%), larceny (75%), burglary (74%), robbery (70%), or those possessing illegal weapons (70%). Within 3 years, only 2.5% of released rapists were arrested for another rape, and 1.2% of those who had served time for homicide were arrested for homicide. These are the lowest rates of re-arrest for the same category of crime.


Sources:

http://www.heartsandminds.org/prisons/facts.htm

http://www.stateline.org/live/ViewPage.action?siteNodeId=136&languageId=1&contentId=14835

http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/abstract/rpr94.htm

“The Causes of Recidivism in the Criminal Justice System and Why It Is Worth the Cost to Address Them.” Nashville Bar Journal. Dec 06/Jan 07. (April 21, 2009).